Cal Hort Seed Exchange 2002

The Cal Hort Seed Exchange is open to members only. If you're not a member, please click on the "Membership" link to your left to find out how to become one! This year's Exchange is now officially closed. Keep collecting your seeds to donatein 2003!

Click on the underlined names to view images. Many links take you the CalFlora database, a comprehensive database of plant distribution information for California; a web accessible, publicly available tool for synthesis of data from disparate sources. They are always looking for volunteers and photos of plants not yet catalogued. If you would like to contribute in some way, click here.

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Thanks to those who donated seed for the exchange this year, without whose participation this program would not be possible, and whose initials in the list below indicate their expressed willingness to be contacted about the plants from which the donated seed came and the conditions under which they grow: Alice Bachelder (AB*), Alan Baker (AB#), Elizabeth Bade (EB), Ruth Bancroft Garden (RBG), Christi Carter (CC), Betsy Clebsch (BC), Barrie and Carol Coate (BCC), Ann DeRosa (AD), David Feix (DF), Melissa Harris (MH), Katherine Henwood (KH), Ed Holm (EH), Mary Sue Ittner (MSI), Kristin Jacob (KJ), Chip Lima (CL), Daisy Mah (DM*), Don Mahoney (DM#), John Marchant (JM*), Charlotte Masson (CM), Joshua McCullough (JM#), David Norton (DN), Bruce Peters (BP), Katherine Pyle (KP), Quarryhill Botanical Garden (QBG), Carla Reiter (CR*), Corina Rieder (CR#), Glen Risdon (GR), Wayne Roderick (WR), Paul Santens (PS), Richard Starkeson (RS), UC Botanical Garden (UCBG), Richard Wagner (RW), Bob Werra (BW), Nancy Wilson (NW), G. Winsemius (GW), Kristin Yanker-Hansen (KYH), and those whose gratefully received donations remain anonymous. Nomenclature and descriptions are those given by these donors.

1. Abelmoschus manihot (KYH): tender tropical from Nepal, establish early spring so roots will winter over; large; heat, sun, regular garden water

2. Abutilon palmerii (KYH): desert plant, soft gray leaves, upright bright golden flowers; does not tolerate both cold and wet at the same time, so shelter from winter rain

3. Abutilon thapsis (KYH): to 8’; yellow flower

4. Abutilon megapotamicum hyb (KYH): to 10’; blooms even when cold has defoliated it completely

5. Abutilon hyb (KYH): red flower, probably Mauna Loa or Monarch

6. Acacia boormanii (BC): shrub to 10’x10’; yellow flower, fine grayish foliage; very drought tolerant

7. Acacia cultriformis: Knife Acacia; shrub to 14’x14’; brilliant yellow flower, gray serrate leaves; very drought tolerant

8. Acacia pravissima (BC)

9. Acacia vestita (BC)

10. Acantholimon acerosum (JM#)

11. Actaea rubra (PS)

12. Aeoniopsis cabulica (JM*)

13. Agapanthus inapertus ssp pendula (DM#)

14. Agastache pringlei: perennial to only 2’; hot pink flower, basal crown

15. Agave parryi (BCC)

16. Ageratum corymbosa (DF): choice shrub for part shade; purplish foliage in winter

17. Agrostemma ‘Ocean Pearl’ (DM*): spring annual; single white subtly-veined flower

18. Alcea rosea (AB*): hollyhock; pink single flower

19. Alcea hyb (AB#): two-tone pink flower

20. Alcea hyb (KYH): deep pink flower, long lived (parent plant in its fourth year and continues to put out new leaves)

21. Alcea hyb (KYH): deep pink flower, very nice color

22. Alcea hyb (KYH): maroon flower, probably offspring of nigra though not as dark; good bloomer sending up spikes all summer

23. Alcea hyb (KYH): parent with spectacular white double flower, no other hollyhocks around so should be true

24. Alcea hyb (KYH): yellow flower, from a plant that bloomed at 8’ tall and didn’t fall down

25. Alcea hyb (KYH): yellow flower, probably rugosa or rugosa cross

26. Allium aflatunense ‘Purple Sensation’ (RW)

27. Allium christophii (RW, NW): heads to 6” of purple flower on stem to 30”, good for drying

28. Allium dichlamydeum (DM#)

29. Allium senescens montanum (KP): subspecies found from Ukraine through northern Portugal in dry rocky places; slowing-spreading clumps of evergreen strap-shaped leaves; hemispherical clusters of lilac flower on stalks to 18” in summer

30. Allium turcomanicum (KP): slowing-spreading clumps of evergreen strap-shaped leaves; hemispherical clusters of pink to mauve flower on stalks to 24”

31. Allium sp (AB#): giant heads of pink flowers

32. Aloe plicatilis (DF)

33. Alstroemeria hyb ‘Ligtu’ (DF)

34. Amaranthus gangeticus (CR#): Elephant Head Amaranth; heirloom annual 2’–4’ with oddly shaped flower heads; sun

35. Ammi visagna ‘Green Mist’ (DM*): looks like a showier Queen Anne’s Lace; attracts beneficial insects

36. Anchusa azurea (RW)

37. Anemone coronaria (WR): cerise flower

38. Anemone coronaria (WR): purple flower

39. Anemone sp (WR): from Antioch, Turkey

40. Angelica archangelica

41. Anoda cristata (KYH): Opal Cup; Texas native; pink flower with white stamens; average water, needs less once established

42. Anthemis tinctoria Kelwayi (RW)

43. Aquilegia formosa (JM#)

44. Aquilegia hyb (CM): dark blue flower

45. Aquilegia hyb: pink and white flower

46. Aquilegia hyb: purple and cream flower

47. Aquilegia hyb: very dark purple flower

48. Aquilegia hyb: yellow flower

49. Aralia chinensis (DF)

50. Arctotis venusta or stoechadifolia (DM*): neat annual; white daisy with blue stamens; gray leaves; drought tolerant

51. Aristolochia durior? (JM*): beautifully marbled round leaves, smaller plant to 18”

52. Asarina erubescens (CR#): Climbing Snapdragon; pink flower; vine to 15’; sun to part shade, moderate water

53. Asclepias “Ice Ballet” (NW)

54. Asclepias curassavica (AB#, EB): perennial; red and orange flowers

55. Asclepias fascicularis (CC): umbels of white and pink flower, narrow leaves, to 3’; native to western US

56. Asclepias fruticosa (RW)

57. Asclepias speciosa (JM#, WR)

58. Asperula orientalis (DF): blue sweet woodruff

59. Astrantia carniolica (CC)

60. Balsamorhiza sagittata (DM#): wild collected at Squaw Valley (Lake Tahoe)

61. Berlandiera lyrata (AB#): yellow flower; from Cal Hort field trip to New Mexico

62. Bignonia violacea (AB#): vine

63. Bomarea acutifolia (DM#)

64. Bomarea sp (RS): flower salmon outside, yellow inside; collected by Martin Grantham; germination takes three months or more

65. Bomarea sp (RS): seedling of unknown parent; very large seed pods that expose large scarlet fruit; germination takes three months or more

66. Brachychiton ‘Majestic Beauty’ (RBG)

67. Brassica hyb: ornamental cabbage

68. Brodiaea californica (WR)

69. Brodiaea jolonensis (MSI): California bulb; short with purple flower; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

70. Brugmansia sp: white flower

71. Buddleja japonica (QBG)

72. Calandrinia grandiflora (DF): tender succulent from Chile; very showy magenta flower

73. Calceolaria chelidonioides (CC)

74. Calendula hyb (BC): annual to 18”, is in bloom year round; never gets mildew

75. Calochortus amabilis (BW): yellow globe 4”–6”

76. Calochortus catalinae (BW): large white-pink bowl with lavender center, 12”–24”

77. Calochortus luteus (DM#)

78. Calochortus splendens (BW): medium lavender bowl with dark center, 12”–18”

79. Calochortus umbellatus (MSI, BW): California bulb; dainty with a long bloom time, pretty flower white with markings, 4”–6”; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

80. Calochortus venustus (BW): large white to maroon bowl with colorful center, 12”–18”;

81. Calochortus venustus v sanguineus (BW): large scarlet bowl, 12”–18”

82. Calochortus vestae (BW): large white bowl with colorful center, 12”–18”

83. Calochortus weedii (BW): large yellow cup with hairs, 12”–18”

84. Camassia quamash (MSI): wild collected California bulb found in areas very wet in spring; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

85. Carpenteria californica (AB#): California native shrub; wonderful white flower with yellow stamens

86. Catalpa bignoides (JM#)

87. Celosia hyb (RW): mixed

88. Centaurea macrocephala (RBG)

89. Centranthus ruber ‘atrocarmineus’? (RW)

90. Cephalaria gigantea (RW)

91. Ceratotheca triloba (CC): Wild Foxglove, from Kirstenbosch; fast growing upright annual; pendulous white or mauve flowers on tall spikes during summer; sow in spring; full sun

92. Cerinthe major (CM)

93. Ceropegia woodii (EH): Rosary Vine; indoors in a sunny window; will bloom in one year

94. Cestrum nocturnum (RW)

95. Chasmanthe floribunda (WR)

96. Chasmanthium latifolium (CC): Northern Sea Oats

97. Chelidonium majus ‘Flore Pleno’ (PS)

98. Chlorogalum pomeridianum (RW): collected in northeast Mendocino County

99. Chrysanthemum coronaria (RW)

100. Chrysanthemum parthenium: Feverfew

101. Cirsium occidentale (RW): pink

102. Clarkia concinna ssp. raichei (MSI): California annual

103. Clematis tangutica (BP): vigorous deciduous climber to 15’; flower in masses of single yellow bells in summer followed by Dr Seussian fluffy seed heads; Group 3

104. Clematis viorna (PS)

105. Cleome spinosa (DM*): purple flower

106. Cleome spinosa ‘Helen Campbell’ (DM*): white spider flower

107. Clerodendrum sp (DF): South African from Gary Hammer; small leaves; shrubby; pink flower year round

108. Cosmos bipinnata ‘Dazzler’ (RW)

109. Crocosmia masonorum ‘Lucifer’ (PS)

110. Crocosmia masonorum: solid pale orange flower

111. Cupressus abramsiana? (GR)

112. Cyclamen africanum (WR)

113. Dahlia apiculata (DM#): small tree dahlia; everblooming

114. Dahlia coccinea

115. Datura ferox (RBG)

116. Datura meteloides (RBG, AD)

117. Delphinium luteum (MSI): rare California native from garden strain; open pollinated so may not be completely pure

118. Delphinium hespericum (MSI): California native; purple flower; open pollinated

119. Delphinium hespericum ssp. pallescens (MSI): California native; white flower

120. Dianella ensifolia (DF): large growing, bamboo-like canes to 6’; typical showy purple-blue berries

121. Dianella intermedia (DF)

122. Dianthus carthusianorum (CC): deep red-pink flower

123. Dianthus sp (BC): good plant near walkways

124. Dichelostemma ida maia (BW)

125. Dierama pulcherrima (AD, KH)

126. Dierama pulcherrima (CM): white flower

127. Digitalis purpurea (AB*, AB#): foxglove

128. Dorycnium hirsutum (RW)

129. Dracocephalum forestii (GW)

130. Dracocephalum moldavica: summer annual to 2’; spectacular bluish purple bloom in many spikes that look like a salvia

131. Dyckia sp (UCBG): beautiful rosettes of purple leaves

132. Echinacea ‘White Swan’ (CC)

133. Echinacea purpurea ‘Bravado’ (CC)

134. Epiphyllum hyb (JM*): one parent ‘Meda’; huge yellow flowers

135. Eriogonum crocatum (JM*)

136. Eriogonum giganteum (PS)

137. Eriogonum pauciflorum ssp nebraskaense (JM*)

138. Eriogonum umbellatum v minus (JM*)

139. Eriophyllum lanatum v achillaeoides (RW): collected in northeast Mendocino County

140. Eryngium creticum?

141. Erysimum bicolor (DM#): Mediterranean shrub; pink flower

142. Eschscholzia californica (AB*): white flower

143. Eschscholzia californica ‘Purple Gleam’ (CC)

144. Eucomis bicolor (JM*): hybrid parent with pure white flowers

145. Euphorbia marginata (JM#)

146. Ferraria crispa ssp. nortierii (MSI): South African bulb; strangely wonderful flower with white center; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

147. Ferraria uncinata (MSI): South African bulb; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

148. Ferula communis (BC)

149. Fibigia clypeata (WR)

150. Francoa sonchifolia (DF)

151. Freesia (=Anomatheca, =Lapeirousia) laxa (AB*): coral flower in spring, summer dormant; self-sows in a pleasant fashion

152. Fritillaria affinis (WR): good green color; from Mendocino Pass

153. Fritillaria pinetorium (WR)

154. Fuchsia boliviana alba (DF)

155. Galvezia speciosa (DF)

156. Geissorhiza monanthos (MSI): South African bulb; flower purple with transparent center; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

157. Geum pyrenaicum (GW)

158. Geum triflorum (GW)

159. Gilia capitata (DM#)

160. Gladiolus carmineus (MSI): South African bulb; blooms in fall before leaves emerge; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

161. Gladiolus tristis (DM#)

162. Gladiolus sp (BW): maroon with yellow center, darkens in the evening; fragrant in the evening

163. Gladiolus sp: magenta flower

164. Glaucium flavum (DN): golden-orange flowers, hairy gray-green leaves

165. Gomphocarpus physocarpus (UCBG)

166. Gomphrena globosa: annual; tall strain to 18”; purple flower; loves heat

167. Grewia occidentalis (DF)

168. Habrabthus robustus (EH): lovely fall bloomer; start in pot and transplant after three years

169. Helenium autumnale (CC)

170. Helenium sp (AB#): yellow flowers; very rare, long time to mature

171. Helianthus annuus (RW)

172. Helianthus annuus ‘Giant Greystripe’ (CC)

173. Helianthus annuus ‘Pacino’ (CC)

174. Helianthus annuus ‘Vanilla Ice’ (CC)

175. Helianthus hyb (AB#): dark red and yellow flowers for four months if dead-headed; great for back of border

176. Heliopsis helianthoides (RW)

177. Heracleum lanatum (DM*)

178. Hesperaloe parviflora (DM*): to 4’; blooms all summer into fall, attracts hummingbirds

179. Hesperantha vaginata (BW): yellow and brown cups, 4”–6”;

180. Hibiscus biseptus (KYH): desert plant from Arizona; yellow flower; nettle-like hairs, so wear gloves while pruning; no winter rain

181. Hibiscus calyphyllus? (KYH): flowers to 3”, yellow with black interior; tropical from Hawaii

182. Hibiscus cardiophylla (KYH): desert plant from Texas; striking red 2” flower in summer; cold hardy but not wet hardy – protect from winter rain; scarify and soak seed

183. Hibiscus denudata (KYH): southern Arizona; 1” flower lavender with red throat, fine foliage; cold hardy if kept dry – protect from winter rain

184. Hunnemannia fumariaefolia (CR#): Mexican Tulip Poppy; bush poppy with lovely light yellow flower; full sun, drought tolerant

185. Hyssopus officinalis ‘Pink Sprite’ (CC)

186. Idesia polycarpa (QBG)

187. Impatiens balfouri (CC, DF)

188. Incarvillea arguta (QBG)

189. Indigofera natalensis (CC): from Kirstenbosch

190. Iochroma grandiflorum (RS): purple flower

191. Ipomaea ‘Grandpa Otts’ (CC, MH, DN): annual to 10’; dark purple flowers, prolific bloom; heirloom; full sun

192. Iris ensata (QBG)

193. Iris hyb (AB*): purple flower; Pacific Coast hybrid

194. Iris hyb (AB#): yellow flower, leaves striped white – very ornamental

195. Isatis glauca (BC)

196. Isoplexis canariensis (UCBG)

197. Isoplexis sceptrum: orange flower

198. Kennedia rubicunda (AD): vine; red-orange flower

199. Kitaibellia vitifolia (KYH): monotypic perennial mallow to 3’, from Balkans; white flower late spring through early summer, petals separate to allow sepals to peek through to show an interesting structure; needs some shade

200. Knautia arvensis (CC)

201. Kochia scoparia v trichophylla

202. Koelreuteria paniculata v apiculata (QBG)

203. Lachenalia pustulata (MSI): South African bulb; purple flower; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

204. Lactuca sativa ‘Black-Seeded Simpson’ (CC): lettuce

205. Lactuca sativa: lettuce

206. Lathyrus odorata ‘Painted Lady’ (CM)

207. Lepechinia hastata (AB*): 8” scapes of magenta flower in fall; to 4’ tall, 2’ wide; resists deer and drought

208. Leptospermum minutifolium (CC)

209. Leucadendron salignum (KJ)

210. Lewisia cotyledon (AB#): yellow flower

211. Lewisia cotyledon (AB*): ‘Rainbow’ strain, flower striped, pink, coral, or white; succulent leaf rosettes to 6”; for pots or rock garden, pebble collar around crown, must have good drainage, summer water OK for longer bloom

212. Liatris spicata

213. Liatris spicata: purple flower

214. Liatris spicata: white flower

215. Lilium leucanthum (QBG)

216. Lilium maritimum (MSI): California native; red flower; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

217. Lilium pardalinum (WR)

218. Linanthus liniflora (GW)

219. Linaria gynistifolia x L. purpurea hybrids (KP): perennial; fairly drought tolerant; full sun or light shade; best in masses; seeds from offspring of natural hybridization between L. purpurea, L. purpurea ‘Canon Went’, L. purpurea alba, and various Linaria x purpurea ‘Heartwood’ varieties; most will look like L. purpurea or L. purpurea ‘Canon Went’

220. Lobelia cardinalis (DN):

221. Lobelia cardinalis ‘Queen Victoria’

222. Lunaria annua (EH, RW): Money Plant; can be weedy; great for dried arrangements

223. Lunaria annua variegata albo marginata (BP, DF): biennial; white flower; frosted leaf edging variegation in second year; seed heads are classic arrangement material; sun-shade

224. Lychnis coronaria (RW)

225. Lychnis coronaria (RW): deep magenta

226. Lychnis coronaria: white flower with pink touches

227. Lychnis viscaria v splendens (DN): pink flowers to 16” over low flat tuft of evergreen leaves

228. Lycopersicon esculentum (CC, EH): heirloom tomato ‘Big Rainbow’; red, orange, and yellow coloring; very flavorful, a personal favorite; indeterminate, 85 days, 16–28 oz fruit

229. Lycopersicon esculentum (EH): heirloom tomato ‘Black Krim’; another favorite; reddish-brown when ripe, red inside; outstanding flavor; tends to crack if not enough regular water; indeterminate; open pollenated

230. Lycopersicon esculentum (EH): heirloom tomato ‘Costoluto Genovese’; large, totally ugly, meaty red paste tomato with excellent flavor; indeterminate; open pollenated

231. Lycopersicon esculentum (EH): heirloom tomato ‘Great White’; large, totally white outside, sweet flavor; indeterminate; open pollenated

232. Lycopersicon esculentum (CC): tomato ‘Heinz 1439’

233. Lycopersicon esculentum (CC): heirloom tomato ‘Mortgage Lifter’, indeterminate, 80 days, big beefsteak 40 oz and more

234. Lycopersicon esculentum (EH): heirloom tomato ‘Mr Stripey’; smaller cousin to ‘Big Rainbow’; milder flavor; indeterminate; open pollenated

235. Lycopersicon esculentum (EH): heirloom tomato ‘Nebraska Wedding’; large, meaty, all yellow, low acidity; indeterminate; open pollenated

236. Lycopersicon esculentum (CC): tomato ‘Oxheart’

237. Lycopersicon esculentum (EH): heirloom tomato ‘Pineapple’; half way between ‘Big Rainbow’ and ‘Mr Stripey’; indeterminate; open pollenated

238. Lycopersicon esculentum (CC): heirloom tomato ‘Yellow Pear’, indeterminate, 70–75 days

239. Lysimachia clethroides (QBG)

240. Mackaya bella (RW)

241. Mathiola bicornis (DM*): Evening Stock, Perfume Plant; purple-pink flower, sweet fragrance, attracts butterflies

242. Meconopsis cambrica (PS)

243. Mentzelia sp (RW)

244. Mimulus cardinalis (NW): showy red flower; easy from seed; good pot plant; keep damp

245. Mina (=Ipomaea) lobata “Exotic Love” (MH, CR#): annual vine to 8’; yellow and scarlet flowers; sun

246. Montanoa grandiflora (RS): multistemmed shrub to 18’, can be cut back annually; germination may be quite slow

247. Moraea bipartita (BW): 2”–4”

248. Moraea ciliata (BW): light blue, 4”–6”; CMLTS

249. Moraea loubseri (BW): purple with black hairy center, 8”–12”; may be extinct in the wild

250. Moraea macrocarpa (BW): blue, 2”–4”

251. Moraea polyanthos (BW): light blue, 12”–18”

252. Moraea polystachya (MSI): South African bulb; long blooming period fall to winter, gorgeous flower blue-purple with yellow nectar guides; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

253. Moraea tripetala (WR)

254. Moraea villosa (BW): lavender

255. Morina longifolia (CC)

256. Narcissus fernandesii (NW)

257. Narcissus ohuallaris (NW)

258. Nicandra physaloides (DM#): black calyx; good for flower arrangements

259. Nicandra physaloides (EH): Shoo-Fly Plant; seed pods are attractive dried

260. Nicotiana sylvestris (CC)

261. Nigella damascena (BC): mixed white, purple, mauve flowers

262. Nigella damascena (WR): Love-in-a-Mist; light blue flower

263. Ocimum gratissimum (CC): East Indian Tree Basil; 4’–8’

264. Oenothera kunthiana (RW)

265. Orthosanthus sp (AB#): small blue iris-like flower

266. Papaver commutatum (KP): annual to 18”–24”; masses of red flower for six weeks; full sun, average water; may re-seed

267. Papaver pilosum (CM, KP): hardy evergreen perennial; foliage in basal clumps with orange flower on 12” stalks; sunny well drained soil, not too much water; reseeds but easy to control

268. Papaver somniferum (CC): double red flower

269. Papaver somniferum (CC): pink peony-flower

270. Parkinsonia aculeata (DF)

271. Patersonia sp (DM#): light blue flower; to 18”

272. Pavonia missionum (KYH): 1” flower fire-engine red with yellow center; from Argentina; may be tender; reseeds at Huntington every year, grows significantly in a season and blooms at a small size, making a wonderful splash of fall color

273. Pavonia sp (KYH): large pink flower all summer into fall; from Yucca Do Nursery

274. Peltaria turkmena (GW)

275. Penstemon ‘Papal Purple’ (AB#)

276. Penstemon barbatus ‘Rondo’ hybrids (JM#, JM*)

277. Penstemon heterophyllus ‘Blue Spring’ (RW)

278. Penstemon heterophyllus v purdyi (JM#): nice purple flower; 8”x14”

279. Penstemon serrulatus (JM#, JM*): easy, lush, floriferous (purple), 18”–24”; long season

280. Penstemon sp (NW): collected by Chris Bartholemew and Don Mahoney in Chiapas; fall bloomer, soft purple flower; to 5’ – can use structurally like a foxglove in the garden, wonderful plant

281. Persicaria capitata (RW)

282. Potentilla sp (CL): from Yunnan; yellow flower; metallic silver foliage

283. Prunus ilicifolia (BCC): pure species, not a hybrid; seed passed the “float test”

284. Prunus subcordata (MH): Sierra Plum, Klamath Plum, Modoc Plum; collected at 4500’ in Modoc County, these freestone plums need quite a few chill hours to set fruit – a fifteen year old plant in a Belmont garden has bloomed profusely each year, but never set fruit – nevertheless a nice small shrub whose small curving branches provide great song bird habitat; seed passed the “float test” and has been scarified and stratified

285. Puya cearulea (UCBG): silver form

286. Puya sp (KJ): orange flowers

287. Rhododendron hyb (CR*): one parent is ‘Victor Reiter Sr’

288. Rolanda (=Senecio) petasitis (RS): frost-tender Mexican shrub; yellow flower

289. Romulea cruciata (BW): brick red, 4”–6”

290. Romulea hirta (BW): yellow, 4”–6”

291. Romulea tetrogona (JM#)

292. Salvia africana-lutea (CC): from Kirstenbosch

293. Salvia apiana (AD, JM*)

294. Salvia argentea (RW)

295. Salvia involucrata (DF)

296. Salvia microphylla ‘Red Velvet’ (DM#): open pollinated garden seed

297. Salvia moorcroftiana (EB)

298. Salvia regla (EB)

299. Salvia repens (BC)

300. Salvia roemeriana (DM#)

301. Salvia transylvanica (EB)

302. Salvia ‘Joseph Halda’s Blue’ (BC)

303. Salvia sp (AB#): tall spikes of gorgeous lavender flower; large leaves; accent back of border

304. Sandersonia aurantiaca

305. Sanguisorba officinalis (QBG)

306. Scabiosa atropurpurea (RW): dark maroon

307. Scabiosa atropurpurea (RW): pink

308. Scabiosa atropurpurea (RW): purple-black

309. Scabiosa orcholeuca (RW)

310. Schizostylis coccinea

311. Schizostylis coccinea ‘Mrs Hegarty’

312. Senecio hyb (DM#): garden naturalized cineraria, tall form, blue flower

313. Sesbania tripettii: small deciduous tree to 14’ with wisteria-like clusters of orange-red pea flowers all summer

314. Setaria palmifolia (BP): large easy grass to 5’; wide tropical-looking pleated leaves; sun-shade; reseeds

315. Silene armeria? (KP): annual with multiple branching stems 6”–18” with smooth gray-green leaves; each branch tipped with a flat-topped cluster of small hot-pink flowers; sun or partial shade, moderate to little water; reseeds but easy to control; people like it but don’t agree what this is!

316. Silene hifacensis (JM*): vigorous, larger type to 24”; cloud of pink flowers

317. Sisyrinchium bellum (JM#)

318. Sisyrinchium californicum (CC)

319. Sisyrinchium striatum (RW)

320. Solanum pyracanthum (RW)

321. Stachys coccinea: perennial from Texas; coral red flowers spring through fall in spikes to 2’; basal crown; drought tolerant

322. Stipa ramosissimus (DF)

323. Stipa tenuissima (RW)

324. Streptocarpus sp/hyb (KH): mixed

325. Stylomecon heterophylla (CM)

326. Sutherlandia frutescens (MSI): South African shrub; large orange-red pea like flower followed by interesting inflated pods; treat as annual starting in fall

327. Tagetes “Harlequin” (NW): to 5’, showy fall bloomer, varied red and yellow striped flower, showy

328. Tanacetum parthenium ‘White Pompon’ (CC)

329. Teucrium hircanicum (EB, JM*): flower in red-purple long Veronica-like spikes to 2’; mounding foliage

330. Teucrium scorodonia (CC)

331. Thalictrum sp (QBG)

332. Tigridia hyb (CM): mixed

333. Trichostema lanatum (AB#): Wooly Blue Curls; California native, needs little water

334. Trichostema laxum (RW): collected in northeast Mendocino County

335. Triteleia bridgesii (MSI): California bulb; red-purple flower with shiny throat; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

336. Triteleia hyacinthina (MSI): California bulb; this form very short, bluish white flower; best started in the fall – bulbs started in the spring are not likely to get big enough before the warmer temperatures and longer days make them want to go dormant to survive dormancy – it is best to refrigerate the seed and wait till fall

337. Tritelia laxa (DM#): dark form

338. Tritelia laxa (DM#): tall form

339. Tropaeolum peregrinum

340. Venidium ‘Zulu Prince’ (DM*)

341. Verbascum blattaria (RW)

342. Verbascum chaixii (RW): yellow flowers

343. Verbascum chaixii ‘album’ (RW): white flowers

344. Verbascum thapsus (RW)

345. Verbena bonariensis (DF, RW)

346. Verbena rigida v polaris (DF)

347. Wachendorfia thyrsiflora (UCBG)

348. Watsonia meriana (JM*): to 24”; spike of orange flowers

349. Wyethia mollis (DM#): wild collected at Squaw Valley (Lake Tahoe)

350. Wildflower (CC): California native mix